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Loan Eligibility

“How much house can I afford?”

It’s a critical question that every homebuyer faces, and one that many people answer by going to a lender and taking out the largest mortgage that the lender will approve. While this strategy will help you get the largest, most expensive house that you can qualify for, being eligible for a loan and being able to afford the property isn’t necessarily the same thing.

From a lender’s perspective, loan eligibility is based on a formula. The most common rule of thumb is that your monthly mortgage payment should not exceed a certain percentage of your gross income. This calculation includes more than just the base price of the house. Depending on your credit history, your lender may have different stipulations and eligibility requirements.

 

Gross vs. Net Income

Although mortgage eligibility is based on gross income, your monthly payments are made from your net income. This means that your ability to afford the payments can look quite different once the mortgage actually needs to be paid. Factor in a car payment, credit cards and student loans to cover the cost of your education or tuition bills for your children and there might not be much left over at the end of the month. Although you may be able to qualify for a certain dollar amount loan on paper, actually taking it might not be the best financial move that you could make. On the other hand, if you are debt free and have a rainy-day fund stashed away in case of emergencies, a mortgage that takes up such a large chunk of your gross income may not be a problem.Another rule of thumb to consider is that your debt-to-income ratio.

 

Determining Eligibility

Sitting down with a calculator will give you a good idea of where you stand in relationship to the loan amount you can probably qualify for and the debt-to-income ratio that you can actually afford. In the excitement to purchase a new home, don’t lose sight of the reality that lenders are in business to make loans. They will let you borrow the maximum amount that you can qualify for because they charge interest on that amount. The more money you borrow, the more money the lender earns in interest. Also, many lenders sell their loans to investors, so the lender itself many not stand to lose anything at all if you default on your loan.

 

House Poor

Taking out a large loan often results in a situation referred to as being “house poor”. Being house poor is generally not a good idea. While you may be able to make the monthly mortgage payments and even pay your other bills too, you are one large expense away from disaster. Should you need to make a major repair to your car, purchase a new appliance, or encounter any other scenario that requires a substantial outlay of cash, you are going find yourself in a tough spot and could end up losing your home, filing bankruptcy, or both.

 

Play It Safe

Regardless of the size of the loan a lender offers, don’t buy more house than you can afford. If you purchase a home and, after making the payments for a few years, find that you have considerable discretionary income left or have substantially increased your income since making the purchase, you can always move. Of course, if you like where you live, you can make extra payments and potentially retire your mortgage early.